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Ogden Centre celebrates 20 years!

The Ogden Centre for Fundamental Physics has celebrated its 20th anniversary.  

Since opening in 2002, the Centre has built an international reputation for its research into the nature, contents and origins of the universe. 

It is home to our Institute for Computational Cosmology and Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology, and houses 160 researchers from over 20 countries. 

Their research is helping to answer questions about the nature of ordinary and dark matter, dark energy and the formation of galaxies like our Milky Way, while challenging our understanding of the laws of physics. 

Sir Peter Ogden (2nd right) with (L-R) Professor Michael Spannowsky, Director of the Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology, Professor Carlos Frenk, Ogden Professor, and Professor Shaun Cole, Director of the Institute for Computational Cosmology.
Sir Peter Ogden (2nd right) with (L-R) Professor Michael Spannowsky, Director of the Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology, Professor Carlos Frenk, Ogden Professor, and Professor Shaun Cole, Director of the Institute for Computational Cosmology.

Nobel Prize laureate Professor Jim Peebles from Princeton University delivered the keynote lecture at a symposium to mark the 20th anniversary of The Ogden Centre.

On large scales this has involved creating the most realistic simulations of the growth of cosmic structure and, on small scales, providing the theory and analysis behind the experiments that led to the discovery of the Higgs boson. Investigating the formation of the Moon, as a stepping stone towards understanding the origin of life, is another strand of our research.

To mark the anniversary, Nobel Prize laureate Professor Jim Peebles from Princeton University delivered the keynote lecture at a celebratory symposium held in late November which also explored the five “Physics Questions” posed when the Ogden Centre was created. These questions concern the nature of dark matter, dark energy and neutrinos, tests of General Relativity and the origin of life in the Universe.

Nobel Prize laureate Professor Jim Peebles from Princeton University delivered the keynote lecture at a symposium to mark the 20th anniversary of The Ogden Centre.
Nobel Prize laureate Professor Jim Peebles from Princeton University delivered the keynote lecture at a symposium to mark the 20th anniversary of The Ogden Centre.

Vice-Chancellor Professor Karen O’Brien and Ogden Centre supporter Damon de Laszlo unveiled the sculpture Journey, by John Robinson, as a birthday present to the Centre. The sculpture was donated by Damon and Robert Heffner III.

The sculpture, Journey, by John Robinson, was unveiled as part of the Ogden at 20 celebrations by Vice-Chancellor Professor Karen O’Brien (centre). The sculpture was donated by Ogden Centre supporter Damon de Laszlo and Robert Heffner III. 
The sculpture, Journey, by John Robinson, was unveiled as part of the Ogden at 20 celebrations by Vice-Chancellor Professor Karen O’Brien (centre). The sculpture was donated by Ogden Centre supporter Damon de Laszlo and Robert Heffner III. 

Pupils from Woodham Academy in County Durham, representing 152 North East of England Ogden Trust partnership schools, also took part in a day of activities including the launch of a collaborative artwork by digital artist Petra Szemán.

The Trust was set up by Durham Physics alumnus and entrepreneur, Sir Peter Ogden, and its generous donations have helped fund the development and growth of the Ogden Centre.

At the anniversary we also remembered Professors Mike Pennington and James Sterling who, together with Emeritus Professor Alan Martin and Ogden Professor Carlos Frenk, created the Ogden Centre.

Discover more about Ogden at 20.

 

 

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